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Four principles of deeply effective math teaching

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I went through and thoroughly updated this article of mine... have you read it in the past?

Four basic principles of deeply effective math teaching

If you were asked what were the most important principles in mathematics teaching, what would you say? I wasn't really asked, but I started thinking, and came up with these basic habits or principles that can keep your math teaching on the right track.

Principle 1: Let It Make Sense
Principle 2: Remember the Goals
Principle 3: Know Your Tools
Principle 4: Living and Loving Math

Play With Your Math puzzles

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An intriguing website.... problems, but not solutions (not that I can see... but maybe, if you subscribe to get email updates, you'd get the solutions?)

https://playwithyourmath.com/

Their idea is,
We take problems that we love, and we adapt them so that everyone (and anyone) can play. We design posters and handouts that hook you visually and explain the problem in just enough words. The problems that we’ve picked require trying, struggling, failing, adjusting, and trying again until, finally, a discovery is made.
I definitely agree... that's what TRUE problem solving is all about! Doing it with math can prepare students for REAL LIFE, where often, the problems they will be facing at the workplace will NOT have a pre-written solution.

And so, that's when it's necessary to try something, struggle, fail, ADJUST your method, and try again... that's what scientists do, day in day out, and people in about any profession who are really successful in their jobs.

The proces…

Tower of Babel and spiritual languages

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I invite you to enjoy this Bible study about the tower of Babel, the division of languages there — AND the picture it gives us of SPIRITUAL languages today.


Math Mammoth printed books sale!

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From September 12 till September 18, 2017, get Math Mammoth printed books at 20% off at Rainbow Resource Center. :)

Math Mammoth Skills Review Workbooks

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Here are some totally NEW Math Mammoth products!

Math Mammoth skills review workbooks have been designed to complement the lessons in Math Mammoth complete curriculum (Light Blue series).

These books are designed to provide a spiral review of the concepts in the curriculum, and to be used during the school year, alongside the main curriculum. After a concept or skill has been studied in the main curriculum, it is then reviewed repeatedly over time in several different worksheets of the workbook.

Each book contains 70-100 worksheets, and is divided into chapters, according to the corresponding chapters in the Math Mammoth curriculum. Each worksheet is designed to be one page, and includes a variety of exercises in a fun way without becoming too long and tedious.

You can choose exactly when to use the worksheets within the chapter, and how many of them to use. Not all students need all of these worksheets to help them keep their math skills fresh, so please vary the amount of work…

Favorite numbers poll

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Math Hombre conducted an unofficial favorite numbers poll... the results are interesting!

If you cannot wait to read the article, Pi is the winner!

Some pointers:
Phi is the golden ratio, a mathematically important constantThe number e is extremely important mathematically and ties in with exponential growth. In fact, of their list, e is my favorite!In case you don't know know why 42 made the top ten... it comes from the book Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy and in that book it is made to be the "answer to the universe and everything" (a joke).
Check out the complete list here.

Babylonian tablet with simpler trigonometry than our own

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This is fascinating!

An ancient Babylonian tablet contains the world's oldest trigonometric table; but not only that.... it is also the only COMPLETELY ACCURATE trigonometric table, because of the very different Babylonian approach to arithmetic and geometry (using the base 60 instead of base 10).

This tablet uses simpler, yet more accurate trigonometry that has clear advantages over our own modern version. It's based on ratios instead of angles and circles.

It is rare that an ancient discovery could be teaching today's mathematicians something new but that seems to be the case here!

I'm sure many students would welcome a simpler approach to trigonometry!

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/aug/24/mathematical-secrets-of-ancient-tablet-unlocked-after-nearly-a-century-of-study