Multiplication, division, laser TVs, logs.

Well today I hopefully have something for everybody.

  1. The site DoubleDivision.org shows you an alternative long division algorithm, which takes the guessing away from estimating how many times the divisor goes into what needs divided. Also called 1-2-4-8 division.

    This is a pretty cool way of dividing! The interactive tool shows you the steps right there for any problem you might come up with.


  2. At MathLogarithms.com you can download an ebook by Dan Umbarger explaining logarithm how's, why's, and wherefore's in all detail for students.

    Great resource for precalculus students.


  3. You might also enjoy an alternative way to multiply called lattice multiplication. I did! It seems pretty simple.



  4. And lastly, if the math topics didn't interest you, how about my hubby's newest website called Laser-TVs.net ... It's about a totally new way of making TVs using lasers.


Comments

Hi... I'm new to "Google Blogger," having just created one to help my users give me feedback. So, I hope I'm using the correct protocol here!

In playing around, I typed in "math" and came across your site. Lots of your entries seem to be people needing worksheets for homeschooling... so...
you might want to take a look at my site.

I'm putting an entire high school mathematics curriculum online, using MathML (MATH Markup Language) and Javascript to create randomly-generated, correctly-displayed math problems. Students can practice to their heart's content... different problems every time. They can print out randomly-generated worksheets + solutions (a different worksheet every time you click) for practice away from the computer (or for quizzes and so on). It's all totally FREE. (I'm a MathML Evangelist... one of the purposes of the site is to spread the word about MathML.)

I have thousands of users around the world. Because MathML isn't well supported yet, the downside is that you need a PC (not a MAC), Internet Explorer 6 (or above) with MathPlayer installed (free and easy, links on site).

Hopefully this can be of use to some of your home-schooling members. And (even more hopefully) some of them will get interested in using MathML + Javascript to create similar web exercises of their own!

Please feel free to have anyone contact me with questions about my site... I always like to know who is using it... and how, if it's working well for them... and so on.

Have a great day!
-- Dr. Carol J.V. Fisher
author/creator of
"One Mathematical Cat, Please!"
http://www.onemathematicalcat.org

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